Shrinking National Monuments: Being Wrong about Public Land

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State Farm. Wildfire outside of Las Vegas, NV. 2013. Flickr.com. Web. Dec 17. 2017

Like many a city person, I don’t always get out in nature enough. Much of my time is spent traversing the skyscraped downtown core of Vancouver, and the neighbourhoods of Mount Pleasant, Coal Harbour and the West End. Yet, there are few things I feel affection for like I do the Western red cedars that stretch into the sky in Stanley Park, the cherry blossoms – on certain blocks in early spring – that obscure everything else in sight. There is something in nature to be seen and felt, a reality impossible to circumvent that is both comforting, and increasingly alienating.

Any person who reads a little news or even pays attention to the weather currents of recent times knows that – meteorologically speaking – things are tough. There was a time that the planet felt sturdier than us, when global warming and climate change were just buzzwords that we knew were happening but whose observed results were not felt. But once you begin to feel the planet’s frailty, it’s impossible to run from it, and to not feel the fear of what is.

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